ART

Accelerated Resolution Therapy

Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) is a trauma-focused treatment developed in 2008 by Laney Rosenzweig, a licensed marriage and family therapist. It builds upon the research of other therapies which utilise eye movements (such as EMDR another trauma-focused therapy) which are effective in the treatment of trauma and a range of other conditions.

ART is quick, efficient, and an effective approach and can achieve rapid recovery in as little as 1 to 2 sessions. Treatment of post-traumatic stress and anxiety has been shown to improve in one to five sessions, each lasting 75 to 90 minutes.

What can ART help with?
ART has been recognised by the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) as an effective psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and personal resilience by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

ART can be used to treat common problems including:

  • Abuse including sexual abuse
  • Addictions
  • Anxiety, Panic attacks, and Phobias
  • Depression
  • Grief and loss
  • OCD
  • Post-Traumatic Stress
  • Sleep issues
  • Smoking cessation

So, what is ART?

ART integrates eye movements with other therapeutic interventions including exposure, positive visualization, and ART’s unique Voluntary Image Replacement (VIR) which replaces negative images with positive ones. While no-one knows exactly how or why the use of eye movements work, research indicates that the way trauma-related memories are integrated with positive experiences, changes the way they are stored. This then reduces the negative emotional and physical responses.

What makes ART unique?

Although there are other treatments that use eye movements, there are some distinct aspects that set ART apart from other approaches including the following:

ART is directive and interactive.

The therapist uses feedback from the client to direct the next intervention which guides the client through the process. Unlike EMDR which follows a more ‘free-floating’ approach, the specific techniques used in ART provide quick relief of symptoms by the end of a treatment session as opposed to having to wait for several sessions. ART focuses directly on negative images which are connected with emotional and physical reactions. The therapist encourages the client to recall the traumatic memories and uses a range of techniques to reduce any accompanying physiological distress throughout the session.

Voluntary Image Replacement (VIR)

Clients are encouraged to replace negative images with positive ones of their own imagining. This often leads to a change in the feelings associated with traumatic memories and immediate relief of their symptoms.

Keep the knowledge, Lose the Pain

Clients will remember the facts and details of the trauma but will lose the distress associated with it, no longer experiencing the same physical, emotional, or visceral response as previously.

No need for details

For individuals who may have trouble talking about their trauma, ART can be done without any discussions of the memories. All the therapist needs to know is where you are in the memory, what sensations you are experiencing, and when things are changing. Many clients report the eye movements and therapy to be calming and feel better even before the session is fully completed.

Finally, no homework or between-session recall of traumatic memories are needed unlike with other approaches.

ART

Accelerated Resolution Therapy

Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) is a trauma-focused treatment developed in 2008 by Laney Rosenzweig, a licensed marriage and family therapist. It builds upon the research of other therapies which utilise eye movements (such as EMDR another trauma-focused therapy) which are effective in the treatment of trauma and a range of other conditions.

ART is quick, efficient, and an effective approach and can achieve rapid recovery in as little as 1 to 2 sessions. Treatment of post-traumatic stress and anxiety has been shown to improve in one to five sessions, each lasting 75 to 90 minutes.

What can ART help with?

ART has been recognised by the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) as an effective psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and personal resilience by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

ART can be used to treat common problems including:

  • Abuse including sexual abuse
  • Addictions
  • Anxiety, Panic attacks, and Phobias
  • Depression
  • Grief and loss
  • OCD
  • Post-Traumatic Stress
  • Sleep issues
  • Smoking cessation

So, what is ART?

ART integrates eye movements with other therapeutic interventions including exposure, positive visualization, and ART’s unique Voluntary Image Replacement (VIR) which replaces negative images with positive ones. While no-one knows exactly how or why the use of eye movements work, research indicates that the way trauma-related memories are integrated with positive experiences, changes the way they are stored. This then reduces the negative emotional and physical responses.

What makes ART unique?

Although there are other treatments that use eye movements, there are some distinct aspects that set ART apart from other approaches including the following:

ART is directive and interactive.

The therapist uses feedback from the client to direct the next intervention which guides the client through the process. Unlike EMDR which follows a more ‘free-floating’ approach, the specific techniques used in ART provide quick relief of symptoms by the end of a treatment session as opposed to having to wait for several sessions. ART focuses directly on negative images which are connected with emotional and physical reactions. The therapist encourages the client to recall the traumatic memories and uses a range of techniques to reduce any accompanying physiological distress throughout the session.

Voluntary Image Replacement (VIR)

Clients are encouraged to replace negative images with positive ones of their own imagining. This often leads to a change in the feelings associated with traumatic memories and immediate relief of their symptoms.

Keep the knowledge, Lose the Pain

Clients will remember the facts and details of the trauma but will lose the distress associated with it, no longer experiencing the same physical, emotional, or visceral response as previously.

No need for details

For individuals who may have trouble talking about their trauma, ART can be done without any discussions of the memories. All the therapist needs to know is where you are in the memory, what sensations you are experiencing, and when things are changing. Many clients report the eye movements and therapy to be calming and feel better even before the session is fully completed.

Finally, no homework or between-session recall of traumatic memories are needed unlike with other approaches.